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Saturday, 25th of March, 2017
The database has been scoured and today's daily dinosaur is...

TRINISAURA

a plant-eating ornithopodan dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica.
trinisaura.png
Pronunciation: TRIH-nee-SOR-uh
Meaning: Trini's lizard
Author/s: Coria et al. (2013)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Santa Marta Cove, Antarctica
Chart Position: 662

Trinisaura santamartaensis

We remember when it used to snow in January and we would get pelted in the face with snowballs by bigger, older kids.... then pelt smaller, younger kids in return. We also remember being warned not to eat yellow snow, but at least one of us didn't listen. We're sad and glad that it doesn't snow much in January anymore, not in England at least, but we were forced to think of snow in January 2013, not only because it snowed heavily for the first time in years but also because the first named dinosaur of this year was from Antarctica, specifically from the Snow Hill Island Formation near Santa Marta Cove.

Sporting a combination of features also found in the Late Cretaceous Patagonian Gasparinisaura, Macrogryphosaurus, Anabisetia and Talenkauen, Trinisaura was the first named non-bird dinosaur of 2013, and the first ornithopod from the Snow Hill Island Formation, the second ornithischian dinosaur from Antarctica and, in fact, only the fourth dinosaur of any ilk known from this continent, until the remains of Morrosaurus were officially described in 2016. The ankylosaur Antarctopelta oliveroi is the first known Antarctic ornithischian and should've been the first named Antarctic dinosaur. But it took so long to excavate and describe that the two William's, Hammer and Hickerson, snook in and stole the glory with their Cryolophosaurus... and it was actually discovered five years later!
(Trini's Lizard from Santa Marta Cove)Etymology
Trinisaura is derived from "Trini" (for Dr. Trinidad “Trini” Diaz, pioneer of geologic studies on the Antarctic Peninsula), and "saura", feminine form of the Greek suffix "sauros" (lizard).
The species epithet, santamartaensis, refers to its discovery near Santa Marta Cove.
Discovery
The remains of Trinisaura were discovered in the Snow Hill Island Formation (Marambio Group) at Santa Marta Cove, James Ross Island, by Rodolfo Coria and Juan José Moly in 2008.
The holotype (MLP-III-1-1) is a partial, skulless, skeleton.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 75-71 mya
Vital Stats:
Est. max. length: 3 meters
Est. max. hip height: 0.9 meters
Est. max. weight: 20 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Ornithischia
Cerapoda
Ornithopoda
Elasmaria
Trinisaura
santamartaensis
References
• J.O. Calvo, J.D. Porfiri and F.E. Novas (2007) "Discovery of a new ornithopod dinosaur from the Portezuelo Formation, Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina". Arquivos do Museu Nacional. 65 (4): 471–483.
• Rodolfo A. Coria, Juan J. Moly, Marcelo Reguero, Sergio Santillana, Sergio Marenssi (2012) "A new ornithopod (Dinosauria; Ornithischia) from Antarctica". Cretaceous Research, Volume 41, Pages 186–193.
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "TRINISAURA :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 25th Mar 2017.
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