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WYLEYIA

a meat-eating maniraptoran theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of England.
Pronunciation: WY-lee-yuh
Meaning: for J. G. Wyley
Author/s: Harrison and Walker (1973)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Sussex, England
Chart Position: 187

Wyleyia valdensis

The funny thing about Wyleyia is that it's known only from a funny bone (a humerus), and not a particularly good one at that. It was originally thought to be a bird, then a primitive coelurosaurian theropod, but now it appears to be a bird again, at least until better remains are forthcoming.
(For Wyley, from the Weald)Etymology
Wyleyia is named for J. G. Wyley who discovered its remains.
The species epithet, valdensis, is derived from the Latin "valdus" ("Weald" referring to the Weald clay) and "-ensis" (from, place of origin).
Discovery
The remains of Wyleyia were discovered in the Weald Clay of Henfield, Sussex, England. The holotype (BMNH A3658) is a damaged partial humerus.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Cretaceous
Stage: Valanginian
Age range: 139-134 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: ?
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: ?
Diet: Carnivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Theropoda
Tetanurae
Maniraptora
uncertain
Wyleyia
valdensis
References
• Vickaryous, M.K., Maryańska, T., and Weishampel, D.B. (2004) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• Harrison, C.J.O. and Walker, C.A. (1973) "Wyleyia: a new bird humerus from the Lower Cretaceous of England".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "WYLEYIA :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 26th Mar 2017.
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