dinochecker
Welcome to our TEXACEPHALE entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 800
fbtwitg+feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

TEXACEPHALE

a plant-eating pachycephalosaurian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of North America.
Pronunciation: tek-sa-SEH-fuh-lee
Meaning: Texas head
Author/s: Longrich, Sankey and Tanke (2010)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Big Bend, Texas
Chart Position: 578

Texacephale langstoni

At first glance Texacephale seemed to be just another specimen of Stegoceras — a bone-headed pachycephalosaurid dinosaur which was named by Lawrence Lambe in 1902. Fortunately, if you're going to be comparing bone-heads there's no substitute for a bone head in-hand and further analysis of Texacephale's gnarly skull dome — the most complete "pachy" fossil ever found in Texas, revealed a few unique features.

Adding fuel to the head-banging fire were half a dozen strategically placed bony "ribs" on the side of its dome. Presumably these would have slotted into corresponding slots on the skull proper and may have acted as stress absorbers if pachycephalosaurids, as is often suggested, did participate in machismo-driven head-to-head ramming contests for mating rights a'la Musk ox and Bighorn sheep.

The discovery of Texacephale in coastal marsh deposits by Darren Tanke in 2008 proved that pachycephalosaurs were not restricted to inland habitats as once thought. Furthermore, a tentative hypothesis turns the theory of an Asian origin for the clade on its head as the older "basal" models all hail from North America.

The author's analysis also stopped just short of ruling out Dracorex hogwartsi and Stygimoloch spinifer as distinct taxa, which is as good as good news for awesomely-named-dinosaur afficionados. With a never ending troupe of lazy-place-name-saurus's marching from the woodwork it would be a shame to lose two critters whose names actually involved a bit of thought.
Etymology
Texacephale is derived from "Texas" (its state of origin) and the Greek "cephale" (head).
The species epithet, langstoni, honors Wann Langston, for his contributions to the vertebrate palaeontology of the Big Bend region.
Discovery
The remains of Texacephale were discovered at "Talley Mountain" (site WPA-1) in the Upper Shale member of the Aguja Formation, Big Bend National Park, Brewster County, Texas, USA, in 2008 by Darren Tanke whilst wandering through an Agujaceratops-dominated bone-bed. The holotype (LSUMNS 20010) is a skull dome. A second dome was found at the site later.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian-Maastrichtian
Age range: 80-73 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 2 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 45 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• N. R. Longrich, J. Sankey, D. Tanke (2010) "Texacephale langstoni, a new genus of pachycephalosaurid from the Aguja Formation, southern Texas, USA."
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "TEXACEPHALE :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 29th Apr 2017.
  top