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JINGSHANOSAURUS

a plant-eating sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of China.
Pronunciation: JING-SHAHN-o-SOR-us
Meaning: Jingshan lizard
Author/s: Zhang and Yang (1994)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Yunnan, China
Chart Position: 327

Jingshanosaurus xinwaensis

Not to be confused with the Early Cretaceous titanosaur known as Jiangshanosaurus, Jingshanosaurus (with one less "a") is famed for being one of the last living non-sauropod sauropodomorphs (aka "prosauropods") but it spent several years on display in museum exhibits before its fossils were officially described.

Because of its size, Chinese paleontologist Zhiming Dong thinks that Jingshanosaurus is merely a super-sized specimen of Yunnanosaurus — a fellow prosauropod from China's Yunnan Province — and if his theory bears out then the former's name will be abandoned because the latter name was coined first. Such are the laws of priority.
Etymology
Jingshanosaurus is derived from "Jingshan" — from the Chinese "jing" (gold) and "shan" (hill, mountain) — for the nearby town of Jingshan (Golden Hill), and the Greek "sauros" (lizard). The species epithet, xinwaensis, is derived from "Xinwa" (its place of discovery) and the Latin "ensis" (from).
Discovery
The only confirmed remains of Jingshanosaurus were discovered in the Shawan Member of the Lower Lufeng Formation at Xinwa, near Jingshan, Lufeng County, Yunnan Province, China.
The holotype (LV 003) is a virtually complete skeleton and skull.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Jurassic
Stage: Hettangian-Pliensbachian
Age range: 199-183 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 10 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 2 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Sauropodomorpha
Jingshanosaurus
xinwaensis
References
• Y. Zhang and Z. Yang (1995) "A Complete Osteology of Prosauropoda in the Lufeng Basin, Yunnan, China". Yunnan Publishing House of Science and Technology, Kunming, China 1-100.
• G.S. Paul (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "JINGSHANOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 30th May 2017.
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