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Welcome to our DRACOVENATOR entry...
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DRACOVENATOR

a meat-eating dilophosaurid theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa.
Pronunciation: drah-KO-veh-NAY-tuhr
Meaning: Dragon hunter
Author/s: Yates (2006)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Cape Province, South Africa
Chart Position: 472

Dracovenator regenti

Dracovenator is known from terribly fragmentary remains — a long, low and kinked "coelophysoidy" snout and a lower jaw with weird lumps and bumps sprouting out of it — that were discovered by James Kitching and Regent "Lucas" Huma in the Upper Elliot Formation of Eastern Cape Province.
(Regent's dragon hunter) Etymology
Dracovenator is derived from the Latin "draco" (dragon) and the Latin "venator" (hunter) which refers to both its probable carnivorous tendencies and its discovery in the foothills of Drakensberg ("Dragon’s Mountain" in Dutch).
The species epithet, regenti, honors Professor Kitching’s long-term field assistant and friend, the late Regent "Lucas" Huma.
Discovery
The only known fossils of Dracovenator were discovered at "Upper Drumbo Farm" in the upper Elliot Formation of Eastern Cape Province (Östra Kapprovinsen), South Africa, by James Kitching and Regent "Lucas" Huma.
The holotype (BP/1/5243) is a fragmentary skull.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Early Jurassic
Stage: Hettangian
Age range: 201-189 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 7 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 400 Kg
Diet: Carnivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Theropoda
Neotheropoda
Dilophosauridae?
Dracovenator
regenti
References
• Smith N.D., Makovicky P.J., Pol D., Hammer W.R. and Currie P.J. (2007) "The Dinosaurs of the Early Jurassic Hanson Formation of the Central Transantarctic Mountains: Phylogenetic Review and Synthesis".
• Yates A.M. (2006) "A new theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of South Africa and its implications for the early evolution of theropods".
• G.S. Paul (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "DRACOVENATOR :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 22nd May 2017.
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