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CORONOSAURUS

a plant-eating centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
coronosaurus.png
Pronunciation: kuh-RON-o-SOR-us
Meaning: Crown lizard
Author/s: Ryan (2012)
Synonyms: Centrosaurus brinkmani
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 669

Coronosaurus brinkmani

After the centrosaurine fever of 2011, when a mind-boggling number of "new" species were christened based on previously named and/or wrongly assigned horn-faced remains, things slowed to a snails pace in 2012 and we had to wait until November 8th for the first one. But Coronosaurus wasn't it, at least if the order of mention grants priority.

Coronosaurus was announced after the references section, right at the end of the paper that described Xenoceratops, which is an odd place to coin a new critter and came across as something of an afterthought. Nevertheless, it followed the trend of the previous year and was raised by Michael J. Ryan for remains that were previously assigned to a species of Centrosaurus, in this case Centrosaurus brinkmani. But such a low-key announcement is less surprising when you consider that Ryan named Centrosaurus brinkmani himself in 2005!
(Brinkman's Crown Lizard) Etymology
Coronosaurus is derived from the Latin "Corona" (crown) and the Greek "sauros" (lizard), in reference to the cluster of "spikelets" on the apex of its frill that resemble a crown. Kind of. The species epithet, brinkmani, honors Dr. Donald Brinkman, a palaeontologist at the Royal Tyrell Museum.
Discovery
The first remains of Coronosaurus were discovered at Sandhill Creek (Bone Bed 138) in the Comrey Sandstone of the Oldman Formation, 14.6 m below the contact with the Dinosaur Park Formation (645 m above sea level), Dinosaur Provincial Park, approximately 50 km from Brooks, Alberta, Canada.
Other remains were recovered from Milk River Ridge in the Oldman Formation, near Warner, roughly 180 km southwest of Bone Bed 138.
The holotype (TMP 2002.68.1.) is a partial skull.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 80-76 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 5 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 2 tons
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Ryan M.J. and Russell A.P. (2005) "A new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the Oldman Formation of Alberta and its implications for centrosaurine taxonomy and systematics".
• Ryan M.J, Evans D.C. and Kieran M. Shepherd (2012) "A new ceratopsid from the Foremost Formation (middle Campanian) of Alberta".
• Paul G.S. (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "CORONOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 16th Aug 2017.
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