dinochecker
Welcome to our CHIALINGOSAURUS entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 841
fb twit g+ feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

CHIALINGOSAURUS

a plant-eating stegosaurid dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic period of China.
chialingosaurus.png
Pronunciation: JYAH-LING-o-SOR-us
Meaning: Jialing (River) lizard
Author/s: Young (1959)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Sichuan, China
Chart Position: 164

Chialingosaurus kuani

Bearing an uncanny resemblance to Kentrosaurus from Tendaguru, Chialingosaurus was the first stegosaurid—the plated branch of the armoured dinosaurs known collectively as thyreophorans—ever found in China. It is also one of the oldest stegosaurids and was once touted as a possible ancestor of all them all. But the discovery of Huayangosaurus, which was a good three million years older, put the kibosh on that theory.

Chialingosaurus is small and delicate, at least amongst its kind, with a long and narrow wedge-shaped skull, rather long and slim forelimbs, and small paired plates on its neck, back and tail. In fact, the only robust part of it is a thick lower jaw that sports just a few, small, well-spaced teeth, with no sign of replacements. The latter may be a species-specific feature as it's unlikely that the only known specimen, not-yet-fully grown, could have used its full compliment through natural wear and tear if replacement teeth were available. Or perhaps it suffered from a nasty case of Jurassic Periodontitis, and the teeth it owned were the only ones that hadn't yet fallen from its rotting gums.
(Kuan Yao Wu's Chialing (fine hill) lizard)Etymology
Chialingosaurus is derived from the Chinese "jia" (fine) and "ling" (hill) for Jialingjiang aka Chialingchiang (Fine Hill River), and the Greek "sauros" (lizard).
The species epithet, kuani, is named in honour of Kuan Yao Wu who was surveying the middle reaches of the Chialing river in 1957 when he discovered this specimen.
Discovery
The remains of Chialingosaurus were discovered at "Taipingzhai" in the village of Pinganxiang, Upper Shaximiao (Shangshaximiao) Formation, Chongqing (Chunking) Group, Quxian County, China, by Kuan Yao Wu (aka Yaowu Guan) of the Sichuan Regional Petroleum Exploration Office in 1957. The holotype (IVPP V2300) includes six fragmentary vertebrae, some limb material, three dorsal spines, a left shoulder blade and three toes. But re-excavation of the area, after numerous fossils were reported by Angui Wang of the Quxian County Hydroelectric Office in November of 1978, resulted in the discovery of further remains including a partial skull. More remains (paratype: CV00203) were later discovered 100 meters from the original site.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Middle Jurassic
Stage: Oxfordian
Age range: 161-156 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 4 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 1000 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Ornithischia
Thyreophora
Stegosauria
Stegosauridae
Chialingosaurus
kuani
Other species
Li Kui, Zhang Yuguang and Cai Kaiji made mention of a second species: Chialingosaurus guangyuanensis, in 1999. However, a mention is all it got, and as an official description has yet to arrive it remains, well, unofficial.
References
• C.-C. Young (1959) "On a new Stegosauria from Szechuan, China". Vertebrata PalAsiatica 3(1):1-8
• Z. Dong, S. Zhou and Y. Zhang (1983) "Dinosaurs from the Jurassic of Sichuan."
• Thomas R. Holtz, Jr (2008) "The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages". /uk.
• Kenneth Carpenter and Philip J. Currie (1992) "Dinosaur Systematics: Approaches and Perspectives". /uk.
• D.E. Fastovsky and D.B. Weishampel (2005) "Stegosauria" in "The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs". /uk.
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "CHIALINGOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 22nd Oct 2017.
  top