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CENTROSAURUS

a plant-eating centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
centrosaurus.png
Pronunciation: SEN-tro-SOR-us
Meaning: Sharp Pointed Lizard
Author/s: Lambe (1904)
Synonyms: See below
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 65

Centrosaurus apertus

Etymology
Centrosaurus (Pointed lizard) is derived from the Greek "kentron" (point or prickle) and "sauros" (lizard). This isn't a reference to its huge nose horn (an unknown feature when it was named) but to the two hook shaped prongs on the apex of its frill.
Due to a misunderstanding of the rules of nomenclature, a panic stricken Hennig added an extra "ur" to his later-named stegosaurid Kentrosaurus (Kentrurosaurus) in 1916 and Franz Nopcsa almost simultaneously renamed it Doryphorosaurus. Although derived from the same Greek words as Centrosaurus, Kentrosaurus begins with a "k" which is enough to separate the two, so the panic was all for nought.
In 1989 Chure and McIntosh unnecessarily coined Eucentrosaurus as a replacement for Centrosaurus, believing Fitzinger had assigned that name to a horned toad in 1843.
Discovery
The first fossil of Centrosaurus was the holotype skull (NMC 971) from Red Deer River in Alberta, Canada, which Lawrence Lambe originally assigned to Monoclonius dawsoni in 1902. Although now known from many specimens of all age ranges (some with skin impressions) and vast Dinosaur Provincial Park bonebeds ("The Hilda Mega-Bonebed") where thousands of individuals died together, perhaps during a failed river crossing, not a single Centrosaurus specimen has been discovered outside of Alberta.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Campanian
Age range: 80-73 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 5.5 meters
Est. max. hip height: 2 meters
Est. max. weight: 2.3 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Synonyms
Brachyceratops dawsoni (Lambe 1902), Centrosaurus cutleri (Brown 1917), Centrosaurus dawsoni (Lambe 1902), Centrosaurus flexus (Brown 1914), Centrosaurus longirostris (Sternberg 1940), Monoclonius cutleri (Brown 1917), Monoclonius dawsoni (Lambe 1902), Monoclonius flexus (Brown 1914), Monoclonius inflexus (Brown 1914), Monoclonius longirostris (Sternberg 1940).
References
• L. M. Lambe (1904) "On the squamoso-parietal crest of the horned dinosaurs Centrosaurus apertus and Monoclonius canadensis from the Cretaceous of Alberta".
• P. Dodson (1990) "On the status of the ceratopsids Monoclonius and Centrosaurus" in "Dinosaur Systematics: Perspectives and Approaches".
• P. Dodson & B. Britt, K. Carpenter & C.A. Forster, D.D. Gillette & M.A. Norell, G. Olshevsky & M.J. Parrish, D.B. Weishampel (1994) "Centrosaurus" in "The Age of Dinosaurs".
• M.J. Ryan and A.P. Russell (2005) "A new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the Oldman Formation of Alberta and its implications for centrosaurine taxonomy and systematics".
• P. Dodson, C.A. Forster and S.D. Sampson (2004) "Ceratopsidae" in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmólska (eds.) "The Dinosauria: Second Edition".
• M.J. Ryan and D.C. Evans (2005) "Ornithischian Dinosaurs" in Currie and Koppelhus "Dinosaur Provincial Park: A Spectacular Ancient Ecosystem Revealed".
• G.S. Paul (2010) "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs".
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "CENTROSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 19th Oct 2017.
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