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ASYLOSAURUS

a plant-eating sauropodomorph dinosaur from the Late Triassic of England.
Pronunciation: ah-SIGH-lo-SOR-US
Meaning: Unharmed lizard
Author/s: Galton (1936)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Bristol, England
Chart Position: 134

Asylosaurus yalensis

(Unharmed lizard from Yale)Etymology
Asylosaurus is derived from the Greek "asylos" (unharmed, offered refuge or sanctuary, safe from violence) and "sauros" (lizard). The species epithet, yalensis, is named for Yale College (now University) where the fossils were taken by O.C. Marsh who participated in fossil exchanges with the Bristol institution and its curator Edward Wilson three times between 1888 and 1890, meaning it was unharmed by the Luftwaffe who bombed the buggery out of Bristol and its fossils in November, 1940, during WWII.
Discovery
The remains of Asylosaurus were discovered by Henry Riley and Samuel Stutchbury in the Magnesian Conglomerate Formation of the limestone quarries of Durdham Down, Quarry Steps, Clifton village, England, in 1834. At this point in time, Clifton was part of Gloucestershire, but it was incorporated into the city of Bristol in Somerset in the 1930s. The holotype (YPM 2195) is a partial skeleton including back vertebrae, ribs, gastralia, a shoulder girdle, humeri, a partial forearm, and a hand. Additional bones from the neck, tail, pelvis, arm and leg that may represent the same individual have also been referred to Asylosaurus.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Triassic
Stage: Rhaetian
Age range: 209-201 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 2 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 25 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
Family Tree:
Dinosauria
Saurischia
Sauropodomorpha
Asylosaurus
yalensis
References
• Riley H and Stutchbury S (1836a) "A description of various remains of three distinct saurian animals discovered in the autumn of 1834, in the Magnesian Conglomerate on Durdham Down, near Bristol". Geological Society of London, Proceedings, 2 (45): 397-399.
• Galton P (2007) "Notes on the remains of archosaurian reptiles, mostly basal sauropodomorph dinosaurs, from the 1834 fissure fill (Rhaetian, Upper Triassic) at Clifton in Bristol, southwest England". Revue de Paléobiologie 26(2):505-591.
• Benton MJ (2012) "Naming the Bristol dinosaur, Thecodontosaurus: politics and science in the 1830s." Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association 123 (2012) 766–778. [letter from S. Stutchbury to Reverend. D. Williams, Bleaden [sic], Somerset. BRO Ref. No. 32079/43/3. Bristol Jany. 16. 1835.]
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ASYLOSAURUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 24th Nov 2017.
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