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ARRHINOCERATOPS

a herbivorous chasmosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Canada.
arrhinoceratops.png
Pronunciation: a-RIEN-o-SEH-ruh-tops
Meaning: No-nose-horn face
Author/s: Parks (1925)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 114

Arrhinoceratops brachyops

Arrhinoceratops—"no nose-horn face"—was coined in 1925 by William Arthur Parks who thought the nose on its face was lacking a horn. Unsurprisingly. However, as pointed out by Tyson in 1981, its lower-jaw-less, lop-sided and slightly mangled skull did have a nose horn, albeit a stumpy one, but Parks was too busy exaggerating measurements and misinterpreting other features to notice it.
Etymology
Arrhinoceratops is derived from the Greek "a-" (not, without), "rhin" (nose, snout), "cerat" (horn) and "ops" (face), named by Parks who thought its wonky skull, due to either injury during life (but probably distortion after death) was lacking a nose horn. The species epithet, brachyops, is derived from the Greek "brachys" (short) and "-ops" (face).
Discovery
The remains of Arrhinoceratops were discovered in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Red Deer River (three miles upstream of Bleriot Ferry), Alberta, Canada, in 1923.
The holotype (ROM 796, formerly ROM 5135 - housed at the Royal Ontario Museum, Canada) is a skull without lower jaws.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Maastrichtian
Age range: 73-67 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 7 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 2.5 tons
Diet: Herbivore
Other Species
Arrhinoceratops? utahensis ("from Utah") was coined in 1946 by Charles Whitney Gilmore for a partial skull (USNM 15583) that G.B. Pearce discovered in Utah's Emery County on 9th July 1937 and two skull fragments (USNM 15875) found by E.M. Spieker and J.B. Reesdale in 1935, albeit with some reservations, hence the "?". It was reassigned to Torosaurus by Douglas A. Lawson in 1976, then had a shedload of material from the Texas Javelina Formation assigned to it by Hunt and Lehmen in 2008. However, it may belong to Arrhinoceratops after all, or represent a new genus entirely.
References
• W.A. Parks (1925) "Arrhinoceratops brachyops, a new genus and species of Ceratopsia from the Edmonton Formation of Alberta". University of Toronto studies. Geological series, No. 19
• C.W. Gilmore (1946) "
Reptilian fauna of the North Horn Formation of central Utah". United States Department of the Interior Geological Survey Professional Paper 210-C: 29-53.
• Tyson, H. (1981) "The structure and relationships of the horned dinosaur Arrhinoceratops Parks (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae)". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 1981, 18(8): 1241-1247, 10.1139/e81-115
• Peter Dodson (1998) "The Horned Dinosaurs: A Natural History."
• Peter Dodson (1994) "Arrhinoceratops" in "The Age of Dinosaurs".
• Hunt, R.K. and T.M. Lehman (2008) "Attributes of the ceratopsian dinosaur Torosaurus, and new material from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian) of Texas". doi: 10.1666/06-107.1
• J.C. Mallon, R. Holmes, J.S. Anderson, A.A. Farke, D.C. Evans (2014) "New information on the rare horned dinosaur Arrhinoceratops brachyops (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.51, No.6
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To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ARRHINOCERATOPS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 26th Jun 2017.
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