dinochecker
Welcome to our ACROTHOLUS entry...
Archived dinosaurs: 797
fbtwitg+feed
Dinosaurs from A to Z
Click a letter to view...
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z ?

ACROTHOLUS

a herbivorous pachycephalosaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of North America.
acrotholus.png
Pronunciation: ACK-rho-THO-luhs
Meaning: High dome
Author/s: Evans et al. (2013)
Synonyms: None known
First Discovery: Alberta, Canada
Chart Position: 670

Acrotholus audeti

When University of Toronto graduate student Caleb Brown passed paleontologist David C. Evans a lump of fossilized bone about the size of a baked potato in 2008 he knew he held in his hands a skull cap from the oldest known pachycephalosaur - or herbivorous "headbanger" - from Alberta, if not the world. Fossils of critters less than 100kg or so are generally too small to survive the ravages of badland elements and Old Father Time, heck this bone only survived because it was a good two inches thick and rock solid, but a complete lack of any other remains didn't curb the author's enthusiasm and, using a like for like downscale based on larger and more complete members of the family, they reckon Acrotholus may have been about the size of a decent-sized dog.
(Roy Audet's high dome) Etymology
Acrotholus is derived from the Greek "akros" (high) and "tholus" (dome).
The species epithet, audeti (aw-DET-eye), honors Canadian rancher Roy Audet, on whose land the fossil was dug up.
Discovery
The remains of Acrotholus were discovered in the Milk River Formation in the badlands of Alberta, Canada, by Caleb Brown in 2008.
The holotype (TMP - Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology - 2008.045.0001) is a domed skull roof.
Estimations
Timeline:
Era: Mesozoic
Epoch: Late Cretaceous
Stage: Santonian
Age range: 86-84 mya
Stats:
Est. max. length: 1.8 meters
Est. max. hip height: ?
Est. max. weight: 40 Kg
Diet: Herbivore
References
• Evans D.C., R.K. Schott, D.W. Larson, C.M. Brown and M.J. Ryan (2013) "The oldest North American pachycephalosaurid and the hidden diversity of small-bodied ornithischian dinosaurs".
Email    Facebook    Twitter    Google+    Stumbleupon    Reddit    Pinterest    Delicious
Time stands still for no man, and research is ongoing. If you spot an error, or want to expand, edit or add a dinosaur, please use this form. Go here to contribute to our FAQ.
All dinos are GM free, and no herbivores were eaten during site construction!
To cite this page:
Atkinson, L. "ACROTHOLUS :: from DinoChecker's dinosaur archive".
›. Web access: 24th Apr 2017.
  top